June 5, 2016

Free Country: A Tale of the Children’s Crusade - Gaiman, Bachalo & Snejbjerg

They say every adult has successfully killed at least one child”, even if only metaphorically. Becoming an adult often means getting rid of our natural curiosity and the sense of wonder that is always present during our formative years. Lacan is even more radical when he explains what happens to us when we enter into the symbolic order: there is a part of us that is left behind, a castration takes place, one that affects all men and women (and not only the male population, as suggested by Freud).
Free Country: A Tale of the Children’s Crusade (Mark Buckingham)
The dividing line between childhood and adulthood was rarely, if ever, explored in superhero titles. So it’s no surprise that Vertigo –DC’s line for mature readers– would attempt to do that, in one way or another. With a great sense of humor, Neil Gaiman explains in his foreword what was the origin of The Children’s Crusade: “all the Vertigo writers and editors were there on a mysterious rural retreat. It seemed unlikely to me, like herding cats. We didn’t flock together naturally, but perhaps this would be our opportunity. Somebody not me had pointed out that if there was one thing that all the Vertigo titles in question had in common, it was that they each had a child in them. So it was decided that the first –and as far as I recall the last– Vertigo crossover would revolve around children”.
The Children’s Crusade (John Bolton)
It was up to Neil Gaiman to give shape to this peculiar experiment, and so he did, in two remarkable, poignant and thought-provoking chapters. The opening sequence takes place in Flaxdown, a nice and quiet English town. One day, all of a sudden, the children are gone… not one, not a dozen: all children disappear. Nobody understands what is going on, there are no clues and, it seems, there is no hope of ever finding them again. That’s when the Dead Boy Detectives decide to take the case. Charles Rowland and Edwin Paine came from the pages of The Sandman; these kids were very keen on classic mystery novels and noir films, and as ghosts they were free to roam the streets and go to places inaccessible even for adults. 
1212 AD (Chris Bachalo)
Soon the Dead Boy Detectives find out the whereabouts of the missing children. “East of the sun and west of the moon, somewhere between the endless summer afternoons of childhood and the shifting clouds of magic, lies the land called Free Country”. But Free Country isn’t simply a haven for lost children, like Neverland was in the Peter Pan tales, in fact, its origin is quite sinister.

Neil Gaiman’s comprehensive knowledge of ancient history and his love for fairy tales are the foundations of Free Country. With a spellbinding ability and a unique sensibility, the British writer starts with a dark chronicle of the middle age, one that feels uncannily real. After decades of failure, an ominous monk pretends to explain why the troops of god have only known defeat during the Crusades. All soldiers are men, and therefore sinners, so in order to take Jerusalem, it was necessary to send an army of pure and innocent combatants: an army of children. And all across Europe, thousands of children accept the sacred duty and willingly enroll in this final crusade. However, the monk’s plan has nothing to do with the holy war. He just wants to sell the children as slaves, and so he does. More than half of the children die during the journey, and the survivors are sold to the most depraved and cruel men. They are tortured, abused, raped and killed. And one by one, their numbers dwindle. In the end only 13 children are left, and in their desperation, they find a way out of the nightmare. They must sacrifice one of their own and use the blood in a pagan rite in order to open a magical portal to another dimension, to the Free Country, a place in which nothing can harm children, not even time itself.
Tefé, Suzy, Dorothy, Maxine & Tim Hunter (Chris Bachalo)
The British author marvelously weaves an intricate tapestry of myths and legends, much like he did during his run on “The Sandman”, only this time he combines the children’s crusade with fables and fairy tales. Gaiman also provides us with a haunting and fascinating portrait of the real Pied Piper of Hamelin and the final destination of the children he took. Throughout the centuries, several groups of children wind up in the Free Country, but with the arrival of the Flaxdown kids, the resources of this haven become scarce and the entire dimensional plane is on the verge of collapse. In order to preserve their existence, they need to obtain a vast amount of mystical energy. That’s why they decide to kidnap Maxine (Animal Man’s daughter, connected to all the fauna of the planet), Dorothy (a deformed girl with strange abilities, and one of the newest additions to the Doom Patrol), Tefé  (Swamp Thing’s daughter, a half-human, half-plant entity with vast elemental powers), Suzy (Black Orchid’s sister, connected to all plants and flowers) and, of course, Tim Hunter (the mightiest sorcerer of our era, as established in “The Books of Magic”).

The first chapter is magnificently illustrated by Chris Bachalo, his versatile lines and graceful compositions really deserve our admiration; Bachalo’s pencils are skillfully inked by Mike Barreiro. Exclusively for this deluxe hardcover edition, Toby Litt, Rachel Pollack and Peter Gross provide the necessary interludes that were absent in previous editions. Gross continues to amaze me as an artist, due to his creative range and his ability to adapt his style, depending on what best fits the story; his pages here are every bit as great as they were in “The Unwritten”. 

The second chapter is partially written by Gaiman. The other collaborators are writers Jamie Delano and Alisa Kwitney, and artists Peter Snejbjerg, Al Davison and once again Peter Gross. The original covers were beautifully painted by John Bolton, and the striking cover for this new edition was done by the talented Mark Buckingham. “A long time ago, I wrote the first part of a story, and waited to find out how it middled, then worked with Jamie Delano and Alisa Kwitney on the end. For years people have asked how and when they could read all the story of The Children's Crusade. I'm glad to say that it's now been retooled and refinished, and is something both old and new - a forgotten jewel”, explained Neil Gaiman. And reading Free Country: A Tale of the Children’s Crusade has certainly been such a delightful experience, one totally worth waiting for, even if the wait took over two decades.
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Dicen que cada adulto ha matado con éxito al menos a un niño”, aunque sea metafóricamente. Convertirse en adulto a menudo significa deshacerse de nuestra curiosidad natural y del sentido de asombro que siempre está presente durante nuestros años de formación. Lacan es aún más radical cuando explica lo que nos sucede al entrar al orden simbólico: hay una parte de nosotros que se deja atrás, se lleva a cabo una castración que afecta a todos los hombres y a todas las mujeres (y no sólo a la población masculina, como sugería Freud).
Suzy (Peter Gross)

La línea divisoria entre la infancia y la edad adulta rara vez fue explorada en títulos de superhéroes. Así que no es insólito que la línea Vertigo –la línea para lectores maduros de DC– abordara el tema. Con un gran sentido del humor, Neil Gaiman explica en el prólogo cuál fue el origen de The Children’s Crusade: “todos los escritores y editores de Vertigo estaban allí, en un misterioso refugio rural. Parecía algo poco probable, era como guiar un rebaño de gatos. Naturalmente nosotros no nos acercábamos el uno al otro, pero tal vez esta sería nuestra oportunidad. Alguien que no era yo había señalado que si había una cosa que todos los títulos de vértigo tenían en común, era que en cada uno de ellos había un niño. Por lo tanto, se decidió que el primer –y hasta donde yo recuerdo– último crossover de Vertigo giraría en torno a los niños”.

Neil Gaiman le daría forma a este particular experimento, dividido en dos capítulos notables, conmovedores y estimulantes. La secuencia inicial ocurre en Flaxdown, un bonito y tranquilo pueblito inglés. Un día, de repente, los niños se desvanecen... no uno, ni una docena: todos los niños desaparecen. Nadie entiende lo que está pasando, no hay pistas y, al parecer, no hay ninguna esperanza de poder encontrarlos. En ese momento los Dead Boy Detectives deciden tomar el caso. Charles Rowland y Edwin Paine provienen de las páginas de “The Sandman”; estos niños eran entusiastas de las clásicas novelas de misterio y del cine negro, y al ser fantasmas eran libres de vagar por las calles y visitar lugares inaccesibles incluso para los adultos.

Rápidamente los fantasmagóricos chicos detectives averiguan el paradero de los niños desaparecidos. “Al este del sol y al oeste de la luna, en algún lugar entre las tardes de verano sin fin de la infancia y las nubes movedizas de la magia, se encuentra la tierra llamada País Libre”. Pero el País Libre no es simplemente un refugio para los niños perdidos, como lo era Neverland en los relatos de Peter Pan; de hecho, su origen es bastante siniestro.
The Dead Boy Detectives (Peter Gross)
El amplio conocimiento de Neil Gaiman sobre historia antigua y su amor por los cuentos de hadas son las bases de País Libre. Con una capacidad mágica y una sensibilidad única, el escritor británico comienza con una crónica oscura de la Edad Media, asombrosamente verídica. Después de décadas de fracaso, un ominoso monje pretende explicar por qué los soldados de dios sólo han conocido la derrota durante las Cruzadas. Todos los soldados son hombres, y por lo tanto son pecadores, así que con el fin de tomar Jerusalén, era necesario enviar un ejército de combatientes puros e inocentes: un ejército de niños. Y por toda Europa, miles de niños aceptan el deber sagrado y voluntariamente se inscriben en esta cruzada final. Sin embargo, el plan del monje no tiene nada que ver con la guerra santa. Él sólo quiere vender a los niños como esclavos, y así lo hace. Más de la mitad de los niños mueren durante el viaje, y los supervivientes son vendidos a hombres depravados y crueles; son torturados, abusados, violados y asesinados. Y poco a poco, sus filas se reducen. Al final sólo quedan 13 niños,  y en su desesperación, encuentran una manera de salir de la pesadilla. Tienen que sacrificar a uno de los suyos y usar la sangre en un rito pagano con el fin de abrir un portal mágico a otra dimensión, al País Libre, un lugar en el que nada puede hacer daño a los niños, ni siquiera el paso del tiempo.
Free Country (Peter Snejbjerg)
El autor británico teje maravillosamente un intrincado tapiz de mitos y leyendas, al igual que lo hizo durante su etapa en “The Sandman”, sólo que esta vez combina la Cruzada de los niños con fábulas y cuentos de hadas. Gaiman también nos proporciona un retrato inquietante y fascinante del verdadero flautista de Hamelin y el destino final de los niños que secuestró. A lo largo de los siglos, varios grupos de niños han ido a parar al País Libre, pero con la llegada de los niños de Flaxdown, los recursos de este paraíso se vuelven escasos y todo el plano dimensional está al borde del colapso. Con el fin de preservar su existencia, necesitan obtener una gran cantidad de energía mística. Es por eso que deciden raptar a Maxine (hija de Animal Man y conectada a toda la fauna del planeta), Dorothy (una niña deforme con extrañas habilidades, y una de las más recientes adiciones a la Doom Patrol), Tefé (hija de la Cosa del Pantano, una entidad mitad humana, y mitad planta con amplios poderes elementales), Suzy (la hermana de Orquídea Negra, conectada a todas las plantas y flores) y, por supuesto, Tim Hunter (el hechicero más poderoso de nuestra era, como fue establecido en “Los Libros de la Magia”).

El primer capítulo está magníficamente ilustrado por Chris Bachalo, sus líneas versátiles y sus composiciones elegantes realmente son admirables; los lápices de Bachalo son hábilmente entintados por Mike Barreiro. De manera exclusiva para esta edición de lujo en tapa dura, Toby Litt, Rachel Pollack y Peter Gross proporcionan los interludios necesarios que estaban ausentes en las ediciones anteriores. Gross me sigue asombrando como artista, debido a su enorme creatividad y su habilidad para adaptar su estilo, dependiendo de lo que mejor se ajuste a la historia; sus páginas aquí son tan estupendas como lo fueron en “The Unwritten”. 
Tim Hunter (Peter Snejbjerg)
El segundo capítulo está escrito parcialmente por Gaiman. Los otros colaboradores son los escritores Jamie Delano y Alisa Kwitney, y los artistas Peter Snejbjerg, Al Davison y una vez más Peter Gross. Las portadas originales están preciosamente pintadas por John Bolton, y la llamativa portada de esta nueva edición fue realizada por el talentoso Mark Buckingham. “Hace mucho tiempo, escribí la primera parte de una historia, y esperé para averiguar cómo se desarrollaría, luego trabajé con Jamie Delano y Alisa Kwitney en la conclusión. Durante años la gente me ha preguntado cómo y cuándo podían leer toda la historia de la Cruzada de los niños. Me alegra decir que ahora ha sido reestructurada y remodernizada, es algo viejo y a la vez nuevo - una joya olvidada”, explica Neil Gaiman. Y leer “Free Country: A Tale of the Children’s Crusade” ha sido sin duda una experiencia muy agradable; la espera valió la pena así hayan sido dos décadas.

12 comments:

  1. Sounds really interesting. I think some of that material carried over into Gaiman's novels like Neverwhere or Coraline.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, it probably did.
      I know most people read this in 1994, but it's all quite new for me.

      Delete
  2. I read this a few months ago, but my review won't go up for a couple more. I really liked the opening chapter, but I didn't think the rest of the book lived up to its epic/mythic/fairy tale tone. The idea of the Free Country was more interesting than anything that was done with it, in my opinion. Amazing work from Chris Bachalo, though, and I agree Peter Gross does a good job fitting into some work from 25 years ago.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, the first chapter is better. I still enjoyed having so many artists working together. And I absolutely love Bachalo's style in this period, I recently got his Death miniseries with Gaiman and the art just blew me away.

      Delete
    2. Oh yeah, Bachalo's work on Death is great too. I also really enjoyed his take on The Witching Hour with Jeph Loeb. I didn't always understand the story, but it sure was pretty.

      Delete
    3. I would love to read The Witching Hour , if only for the art .

      Delete
  3. Precisamente acabo de encontrar mis comics de Vertigo en un disco duro... ha estado en mi lista por años y años

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ¡Vaya casualidad! Yo recién he podido leerlo por primera vez ahora.

      Delete
  4. Cuando el arte de Bachalo no solo era bueno, sino hermoso.

    Ahora tengo suerte si logro distinguir alguna figura que parezca humana en sus páneles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Esta fue la mejor época de Bachalo. Su estilo actual no es malo pero nunca termina de convencerme del todo.

      Delete
    2. "The High Cost of Living" y el primer número de "Generation X" son lo mejor que le he visto.

      Delete
    3. "The High Cost of Living" es espectacular. Realmente ahí Bachalo estaba en su mejor momento. Solamente tengo algunos números sueltos de Generation X, me falta el 1.

      Delete