February 10, 2014

Young Avengers # 15 - Gillen, McKelvie & more

Quite often we assume a cynical posture towards contemporary comic books. We criticize decompression, reiterative exploitation of a certain brand or group of characters, predictability, publicity stunts, lack of creative freedom as a result of editorial impositions, etc. Some might even come to believe that no good comics are produced in Marvel (and DC) due to the current atmosphere of editorial-mandated mega-events. That conclusion, however, would be utterly wrong.

I have read hundreds of comics last year, from every publisher, and although I have enjoyed the proposals of independent creators working outside the big two, what I loved the most, without a doubt, was Kieron Gillen’s Young Avengers. The best of 2013 comes, indeed, from Marvel.

Upon reading “Resolution part 2”, the final issue, I felt an unexpected sadness. The end awakened in me a strong melancholy, that last page, beautifully illustrated by Jamie McKelvie was like a statement about youth and friendship. It was a snapshot, a captured instant, a moment in the lives of the Young Avengers. And it was also a moment in my life. Looking at them and saying goodbye to them made me go through an experience I’m quite familiar with: the sensation of loss I have experienced every time a friend of mine decides to go to another country or another continent; most of the times I expect them to return after a couple of years, sometimes, however, they never come back. And I know then that, despite all apparent opportunities, I’ll never see them again. That is a very special kind of goodbye. They are within reach, at least theoretically, but they are no longer a part of my life.


In a few years, the Young Avengers might return, but they could very well stay in limbo longer than we could possibly anticipate. So yes, it was deeply painful to read the end of this fantastic ongoing series. And now I find myself here, saying goodbye to a group of fictional characters with a heavy heart, almost as if they were real persons going away for a while. That’s the power of good literature and that’s the accomplishment of Gillen. Turning a group of superpowered kids into characters that you will always care for, characters that you can identify with, characters that will make you feel young again.

But we must embrace change and move on. Marvel Boy finally understands that, now that he has ruined his relationship with Kate Bishop. Gillen gives us one final glimpse into the minds and souls of the Young Avengers. If in the previous issues we had the original members on the spotlight, now it’s time to pay attention to Marvel Boy and his silent agony. It’s also time to observe Loki not only as the god of mischief but also as a lonely teenager that feels forced to be in charge of the “dirty work”, the things that need to be done and that most of us never acknowledge appropriately. It is Loki who pays, with the treasure of Asgard, for the organization of the party, who makes sure the catering people receive a proper compensation for working through New Year’s Eve.
Becky Cloonan

David Alleyne (Prodigy) still feels a bit guilty about kissing Teddy and incurring in Billy’s wrath. “You just let the party that lurks in the pants undue prominence in the parliament of prodigy”, affirms Loki. And as the two teenagers talk, David discovers that Loki isn’t 100% heterosexual “my culture doesn’t really share your concept of sexual identity. There are sexual acts, that’s it”, explains the Norse deity. Either as a joke or as a serious attempt at flirtation, Loki proposes a special celebration with David. The young mutant kindly refuses alleging Loki isn’t his type. Before disappearing into the night Loki asks David what’s his type. “Good guys”, he answers cheerfully.

Later on, after David accidentally kisses Tommy, we understand how the discovery of sexuality can be life-defining in youth, and how difficult it is to find a comic in the 21st century that will discuss the matter audaciously and intelligently. Young Avengers is a title of historical significance because it’s the first superhero comic to fully embrace the diversity of sexual orientations and the only 100% GLBT American mainstream book.

Jokes aside, if we take a look at the group we might consider the following attributes: Ms. America is lesbian, Prodigy is bisexual, Marvel Boy is pansexual (he will have sex with human males and females, as well as with aliens of all shapes and sizes), Hulkling is homosexual, Wiccan is homosexual, Loki is transsexual (we have seen him as a woman and using his/her feminine charms to seduce men during Straczyinki’s run on Thor), Speed is bi-curious and Kate Bishop is the only heterosexual member of the team. 

The Young Avengers finale was conceived as a jam special, and this time we get to see the drawings of Becky Cloonan (in charge of portraying a brooding Marvel Boy), Ming Doyle (her depiction of Loki is quite good) and Joe Quinones (who contributes with a lot of humor in Prodigy’s sequence, including the kiss with Tommy). 

In the letter column, many fans talk about how frustrated they feel now that the title has come to an end. I do not feel frustration, because I truly think that Gillen and McKelvie did the best comic I’ve read in years, and none of it would have been possible with editorial interference or the obsessive desire of endlessly milking the same property… a common practice in the big two.
Ming Doyle

Gillen and McKelvie are very thankful to us, the readers. And I’m very thankful to those who made the book possible: Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, Annie Wu, Becky Cloonan, Bryan Lee O’Malley, Christian Ward, Clayton Cowles, David LaFuente, Emma Vieceli, Hannah Donovan, Idette Winecoor, Jake Thomas, Allan Heinberg, Jim Cheung, Joe Quinones, Jordie Bellaire, Kate Brown, Kris Anka, Lee Loughridge, Manny Mederos, Maris Wicks, Matthew Wilson, Mike Norton, Ming Doyle, Morry Hollowell, Nathan Fairbairn, Skottie Young, Stephanie Hans, Stephen Thompson, Tradd Moore, and editor Lauren Sankovitch and assistant editor Jon Moisan.

I would also like to congratulate those who shared their secrets, fears, joys and dreams in the letter columns. I have felt really moved by those who wrote in to talk about their lives, and how they struggle against bullying, homophobia and discrimination, if some of them found inspiration on the pages of this book, then the journey has not been in vain. So a big thank you to Reed Beebe, Wally, Brad, Steven Roche, Avery, Hansel, Chuck McKinney, Matt Brooks, Graham Weaver, Amanda, Mason, Steven Butler, Patrick Bartlett, Jonathan Robbins, Mia, Saul Santos, Arcadio Bolaños (yay! that’s me! now click here to read my letter), Jack Ingram, Carlos Aguirre Reyna, Lauren, Becky Male, Izrin Iskandar, Brennan O’Reagan, Zamisk, Joe Douglas, Kami Spangler, Calvin, Trent Farrell, Lyn, Carlton Glassford, Oliver Ortiz, Michael J. Allen, Indie Gale, Clarissa Johnson, Niamh, Souxie, Regina Belmonte, Rachel Yu, Thomas Rowley, Chiara, James Hunter, Bridget Natale, Andy E, Connor Stephenson, C. Morgan Leigh, Zae, Sara Hanley, Lucy, Jacques Farnworth-Wood, Maximillian Jansen, Day Summerfield, Amanda, George Laporte, Christian Hernandez, Rachael, Niels van Eekelen, Sarah Urbank, Lawrence, Summer, Rebecca Luttig, Jack Davis, Rob Rix, Miles PDX, Mikey J. Redd, Carey & Brandon.

Young Avengers has been the kind of honest, personal and tremendously creative project that will be forever remembered in comic history. And I’m very proud to say that, however briefly, I was a part of it. I was there. And I fucking loved it.

Young Avengers # 11, Young Avengers # 12, Young Avengers # 13 & Young Avengers # 14

Young Avengers # 1-10
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

A menudo asumimos una postura cínica en relación a los cómics contemporáneos. Criticamos la poca cohesión, explotación reiterativa de ciertas marcas o grupos de personajes, predictibilidad, trucos de publicidad, falta de libertad creativa como resultado de las imposiciones editoriales, etc. Algunos incluso podrían creer que no hay buenos cómics en Marvel (ni en DC) a causa de la actual atmósfera de mega-eventos mandados por la editorial. Esa conclusión, sin embargo, sería totalmente errónea.
Joe Quinones

He leído cientos de cómics el año pasado, y aunque he disfrutado las propuestas de creadores independientes que trabajan alejados de Marvel y DC, lo que más me encantó, sin duda alguna, fue Young Avengers de Kieron Gillen. Lo mejor del 2013 es de Marvel.

Luego de leer “Resolución parte 2”, el número final, sentí una inesperada tristeza. El final despertó en mí una fuerte melancolía, esa última página, hermosamente ilustrada por Jamie McKelvie era como una declaración sobre la juventud y la amistad. Era una instantánea, un momento capturado, un segundo en las vidas de los Jóvenes Vengadores. Y también era un momento en mi vida. Mirándolos y despidiéndome de ellos, fue como experimentar algo que me resulta muy familiar: la sensación de pérdida que he sentido cada vez que un amigo decide irse a otro país o a otro continente; la mayoría de las veces, espero que regresen luego de un de par de años, a veces, sin embargo, nunca vuelven. Y entonces sé que, a pesar de todas las oportunidades, nunca más los veré de nuevo. Ese tipo de despedidas es muy especial. No han desparecido, al menos teóricamente, pero ya no son parte de mi vida.

En algunos años, los Jóvenes Vengadores podrían regresar, pero bien podrían quedarse en el limbo más tiempo de lo que posiblemente podríamos anticipar. Así que fue profundamente doloroso leer el final de esta fantástica serie mensual. Y ahora estoy aquí, acongojado, casi como si se tratara de personas de verdad que estarán lejos por un tiempo. Ese es el poder de la buena literatura y ese es el logro de Gillen. Convertir a un grupo de chiquillos con poderes en personajes a los que siempre apreciarás, personajes con los que te identificas, personajes que te hacen sentir joven nuevamente. 

Pero debemos aceptar el cambio y seguir avanzando. Marvel Boy finalmente lo entiende, ahora que ha arruinado su relación con Kate Bishop. Gillen nos da un último vistazo a las mentes y almas de los Jóvenes Vengadores. Si en números anteriores los miembros originales estaban al centro del escenario, ahora es el momento de prestarle atención a Marvel Boy y a su agonía silenciosa. También es tiempo de observar a Loki no sólo como el dios de los enredos sino también como un adolescente solitario que se siente obligado a encargarse del “trabajo sucio”, las cosas que necesitan hacerse aunque no les demos el reconocimiento adecuado. Es Loki quien paga, con el tesoro de Asgard, la organización de la fiesta, quien se encarga de que la gente del catering reciba una compensación apropiada por trabajar en año nuevo.
Joe Quinones

David Alleyne (Prodigy) todavía se siente un poco culpable por besar a Teddy e incurrir en la ira de Billy. “Tan sólo le permitiste a la fiesta que acecha en tus pantalones una indebida prominencia en el parlamento del prodigio”, afirma Loki. Y mientras los dos adolescentes conversan, David descubre que Loki no es 100% heterosexual “mi cultura realmente no comparte tu concepto de identidad sexual. Hay actos sexuales, eso es todo”, explica la deidad nórdica. Ya sea como una broma o un intento serio de flirtear, Loki le propone a David una celebración especial. El joven mutante amablemente rehúsa alegando que Loki no es su tipo. Antes de desaparecer en la noche, Loki le pregunta a David cuál es su tipo. “Los chicos buenos”, responde alegremente.

Más tarde, después de que David besa accidentalmente a Tommy, entendemos cómo el descubrimiento de la sexualidad puede definir la vida de los jóvenes, y vemos lo difícil que es encontrar un cómic en el siglo XXI que discuta el tema inteligente y audazmente. "Young Avengers" es un título de relevancia histórica porque es el primer cómic que acepta por completo la diversidad de orientaciones sexuales y el único cómic de distribución masiva es que es 100% GLBT.

Bromas aparte, si echamos un vistazo al grupo podríamos considerar los siguientes atributos: Ms. America es lesbiana, Prodigy es bisexual, Marvel Boy es pansexual (tendrá sexo con humanos, masculinos y femeninos, así como con aliens de todas las formas y tamaños), Hulkling es homosexual, Wiccan es homosexual, Loki es transexual (lo hemos visto como una mujer y usando sus encantos femeninos para seducir hombres durante la etapa de Straczyinki en Thor), Speed es bi-curioso y Kate Bishop es la única integrante heterosexual del equipo.

El final de Young Avengers se concibió como algo colaborativo, y esta vez vemos los dibujos de Becky Cloonan (a cargo de retratar a un cabizbajo Marvel Boy), Ming Doyle (su retrato de Loki es bastante bueno) y Joe Quinones (quien contribuye con humor en la secuencia de Prodigy, incluyendo el beso con Tommy). 
Last page, final issue / última página, número final

En la sección de cartas, muchos fans comentaron lo frustrados que se sentían ahora que el título llegaba a su fin. Yo no siento frustración, porque realmente pienso que Gillen y McKelvie hicieron el mejor cómic que he leído en años, y nada de esto hubiese sido posible con interferencias editoriales o el deseo obsesivo de ordeñar eternamente un mismo producto... una práctica común en Marvel y DC.

Gillen y McKelvie nos agradecen a nosotros, los lectores. Y yo le doy las gracias a aquellos que hicieron posible esta colección: Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, Annie Wu, Becky Cloonan, Bryan Lee O’Malley, Christian Ward, Clayton Cowles, David LaFuente, Emma Vieceli, Hannah Donovan, Idette Winecoor, Jake Thomas, Allan Heinberg, Jim Cheung, Joe Quinones, Jordie Bellaire, Kate Brown, Kris Anka, Lee Loughridge, Manny Mederos, Maris Wicks, Matthew Wilson, Mike Norton, Ming Doyle, Morry Hollowell, Nathan Fairbairn, Skottie Young, Stephanie Hans, Stephen Thompson, Tradd Moore, y la editora Lauren Sankovitch y el editor asistente Jon Moisan.

También quisiera felicitar a aquellos que compartieron sus secretos, sus miedos, sus alegrías y sus sueños en la sección de cartas. Realmente me he sentido conmovido por aquellos que escribieron para hablar de sus vidas, y su lucha contra los abusos, la homofobia y la discriminación, si alguno de ellos encontró inspiración en las páginas del cómic, entonces el viaje no fue en vano. Así que muchas gracias a Reed Beebe, Wally, Brad, Steven Roche, Avery, Hansel, Chuck McKinney, Matt Brooks, Graham Weaver, Amanda, Mason, Steven Butler, Patrick Bartlett, Jonathan Robbins, Mia, Saul Santos, Arcadio Bolaños (¡sí, ese soy yo! hagan click aquí para leer mi carta), Jack Ingram, Carlos Aguirre Reyna, Lauren, Becky Male, Izrin Iskandar, Brennan O’Reagan, Zamisk, Joe Douglas, Kami Spangler, Calvin, Trent Farrell, Lyn, Carlton Glassford, Oliver Ortiz, Michael J. Allen, Indie Gale, Clarissa Johnson, Niamh, Souxie, Regina Belmonte, Rachel Yu, Thomas Rowley, Chiara, James Hunter, Bridget Natale, Andy E, Connor Stephenson, C. Morgan Leigh, Zae, Sara Hanley, Lucy, Jacques Farnworth-Wood, Maximillian Jansen, Day Summerfield, Amanda, George Laporte, Christian Hernandez, Rachael, Niels van Eekelen, Sarah Urbank, Lawrence, Summer, Rebecca Luttig, Jack Davis, Rob Rix, Miles PDX, Mikey J. Redd, Carey y Brandon.

"Young Avengers" ha sido el tipo de proyecto honesto, personal y tremendamente creativo que será recordado para siempre en la historia de los cómics. Y estoy muy orgulloso de decir que, aunque brevemente, yo también fui parte de ello. Yo estuve allí. Y eso es jodidamente genial.


2 comments:

  1. Esas son las hemanitas Power, en la portada?
    Habra que ver como ha crecido Alex ;-)

    Insisto: tengo que leer esta serie. Solo hojee Children's Crusade, pero aparte de eso no he leido nada de YA

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hola Alex, en la portada, en primer plano y a la derecha está Karolina Dean, de los Runaways (por cierto, también parte de la banda GLBT, y es que ella es lesbiana). Alex Power apenas salió en un par de páginas en el #13 de Young Avengers (el link está justo encima de nuestros comentarios). Alex Power también ha sido uno de los protagonistas de FF, de Fraction y Allred, y fue retratado como un chico de 17 años más o menos.

      Children's Crusade es muy buena, te la recomiendo.

      Delete