September 21, 2015

Wolverine # 1-6 - Greg Rucka & Darick Robertson

Without a mask, even without a superhero costume, Wolverine is still the best there is at what he does, and what he does isn’t pretty; Greg Rucka had this in mind when he relaunched the Wolverine ongoing series over a decade ago, effectively returning to the essence of the character. Wolverine isn’t a colorful superhero waiting to save the world in Professor X’s mansion, Wolverine is Logan, a man usually more comfortable with dirty motel rooms and cheap diners, and that’s the starting point of “Brotherhood” (published in Wolverine # 1-6, July to December 2003). 
Esad Ribic
Logan meets Lucy, a 17-year old waitress that lives across the hall. At first, they barely nod at each other but as time goes by, Logan talks to this girl and realizes how scared she is. Someone is after her. And sooner or later, they’ll find her. Having Wolverine as her neighbor means that the girl has seen him returning home after a savage brawl, wounded and covered in blood, only to see him completely healed the next morning. She doesn’t know who he is, but she understands that a man capable of enduring beatings night after a night, is strong enough to protect her.
Esad Ribic
In the past, Logan has been a fatherly figure for girls like Kitty Pryde or Jubilee. Despite his feral nature and his troubled past, he made them feel confident and optimistic. This time, however, when “the Brothers” arrive, he can’t save Lucy. The brothers shoot at them. Logan’s wounds are healed by his mutant power, but Lucy dies instantly. She leaves behind a journal, a heartbreaking confession that motivates Logan to find out how she got in trouble in the first place.
Esad Ribic
And thus the clawed mutant delves deep into a reality we often ignore or forget that exists. He visits the gun shows, the armament conventions that congregate hundreds of men and women, sometimes entire families, eager to buy guns. There is nothing far-fetched or fictional here, as Rucka analyzes America’s fascination towards firearms. Logan follows the trail of the bullets he takes out from his own body, and eventually he finds the seller he was looking for. Only problem is, someone else is after that man: Cassie Lathrop, undercover agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF).


Rucka has always been obsessed with telling stories from the point of view of female police officers: he did it in Gotham Central with officer Renee Montoya, in DC’s 52 again with Renee Montoya, in Batman with Sasha Bordeaux, in Whiteout with marshal Carrie Stetko, in Daredevil with private investigator Dakota North, in Punisher with army sergeant Rachel Cole, in Lazarus with Forever Carlyle, and so on. In fact, many of Rucka’s detractors have suggested that he can’t write a story unless he has a female officer to tell it, but obviously this is an exaggeration as Rucka has proved time and again that he can also write using the voice of a male protagonist. And that’s the case with Wolverine; Logan is clearly the protagonist, and ATF agent Lathrop is a rich and humanizing supporting character that keeps Logan’s animal side in equilibrium.
Wolverine’s healing factor / el factor curativo de Wolverine

When Logan finally finds the man responsible for Lucy’s death he also discovers something else. The Brothers of the New World are a religious sect, in which the leader can take as many “brides” as he wishes. The brides are underage girls like Lucy, who are tortured and brainwashed to have sex with the leader. Of course, the depravity doesn’t end here, and as the Canadian hero enters further into the lair of the beast, he’s confronted with a shocking and painful truth. Inspired by the world around him, Rucka succeeds in creating a disturbing place that feels very real, so much in fact that the most horrifying element is how mundane and down-to-earth the members of this sect are. 

In the end, Logan loses his temper. He surrenders to his berserker rage, and instead of “doing the right thing” (warning the authorities or capturing the evildoers), he starts killing them in a massacre unlike anything we had seen in a Wolverine title up to this point. The brutal violence is extraordinarily depicted by Darick Robertson, a very talented artist who seems to specialize in ruthless and controversial images. After the massacre, Logan runs away, and agent Lathrop now has an even bigger mystery to solve.

The epilogue, “So. This Priest Walks Into a Bar”, is a poignant and revealing conclusion. Logan can’t come to terms with the fact that he has killed over 20 men in a single night. So he does what every reasonable man would do: he gets drunk in a bar, and he doesn’t stop drinking until Nightcrawler shows up. As a superhero, it is easy for Wolverine (and Nightcrawler) to deal with cosmic threats or megalomaniac villains intent on conquering the world. As a man taking justice in his own hands, however, things are not easy for Logan. And perhaps he’s such a unique and memorable hero because of that, in the end he can just as easily don the superhero mantle or dispose of it, as he sees fit. But regardless of his mission as an X-Man, he always has to deal with the consequences of his acts. 
Removing the bullet / Sacando la bala
Wolverine: Brotherhood may very well be one of my favorite works by Greg Rucka. And what makes this run even more special is Darick Robertson’s amazing art. Years before “The Boys”, the American artist was honing his craft in Marvel Comics. The Logan we get to see here is a man carrying the weight of countless years, he has a bitter expression and enough cruelty in his eyes to scare people away; even when wounded, he looks very dangerous. The battle sequences are absolutely impressive. I particularly love the double page spread in which we see Logan unleashing his rage. 

The cover artist is Esad Ribic, winner of the Arion's Achievement Award for Best Cover Artist (among many other recognitions); heir to masters like Frank Frazetta and Alex Ross, Ribic combines photorealism with impressionism, and the result is a premium selection of beautiful and unforgettable covers. Ribic’s Wolverine is a tough guy, but also a respectable warrior; nonetheless, the Croatian artist also plays with the notion of virility often associated to the most popular mutant, as we can see in the last cover, considered by many as the only example of gay porn in a Marvel publication. Ribic provided fans with “A naked Nightcrawler. A crotch-glowering Wolverine”, and as if that weren’t enough, we also have the suspicious “placement of the beer bottle”. Esad Ribic is famous for his “wicked sense of humor”, and this cover proves why.  
________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Sin máscara, incluso sin el traje de superhéroe, Wolverine sigue siendo el mejor en lo que hace, y lo que hace no es algo agradable; Greg Rucka tenía esto en mente cuando relanzó la colección de Wolverine hace más de una década, regresando efectivamente a la esencia del personaje. Wolverine no es un superhéroe colorido a la espera de salvar el mundo en la mansión del Profesor X, Wolverine es Logan, un hombre que usualmente está más cómodo en las habitaciones de moteles sucios y cafetines baratos, y ese es el punto de partida de "Hermandad" (publicado en Wolverine # 1-6, julio a diciembre de 2003).
Berserker rage / la rabia de un berserker 
Logan conoce a Lucy, una mesera de 17 años que vive al lado. Al principio, apenas se saludan, pero con el paso del tiempo Logan habla con esta chica y se da cuenta de lo asustada que está. Alguien la persigue. Y tarde o temprano, van a dar con ella. Tener a Wolverine como vecino significa que la chica lo ha visto regresar a casa después de una golpiza salvaje, herido y cubierto de sangre, para luego verlo completamente curado a la mañana siguiente. Ella no sabe quién es él, pero entiende que un hombre capaz de soportar palizas noche tras noche es lo suficientemente fuerte para protegerla.
The massacre begins / comienza la masacre 
En el pasado, Logan ha sido una figura paterna para muchachas como Kitty Pryde o Jubilee. A pesar de su naturaleza salvaje y su turbulento pasado, él logró que se sintieran confiadas y optimistas. Esta vez, sin embargo, cuando “los Hermanos” llegan, él no puede salvar a Lucy. Los hermanos abren fuego. Las heridas de Logan se curan gracias a su poder mutante, pero Lucy muere al instante. Ella deja un diario, una confesión desgarradora que motiva a Logan a averiguar cómo empezó a meterse en líos.
Sexual tension: Logan and Lathrop / tensión sexual: Logan y Lathrop 

Y así, el mutante con garras hurga en una realidad que a menudo ignoramos u olvidamos que existe. Él visita las ferias de armas, las convenciones de armamento que congregan a cientos de hombres y mujeres, a veces familias enteras, impacientes por comprar armas. Aquí no hay nada descabellado o ficticio, y es que Rucka analiza la fascinación de Estados Unidos hacia las armas de fuego. Logan sigue el rastro de las balas que ha sacado de su propio cuerpo, y finalmente se encuentra con el vendedor que estaba buscando. El único problema es que alguien más está tras ese hombre: Cassie Lathrop, una agente encubierta de la Oficina de Alcohol, Tabaco, Armas de Fuego y Explosivos (ATF).

Rucka siempre ha estado obsesionado con contar historias desde el punto de vista de policías mujeres: así lo hizo en “Gotham Central” con la oficial Renee Montoya, en “52” nuevamente con Renee Montoya, en “Batman” con Sasha Bordeaux, en “Whiteout” con la alguacil Carrie Stetko, en “Daredevil” con la investigadora privada Dakota North, en “Punisher” con la sargento Rachel Cole, en “Lazarus” con Forever Carlyle, y así sucesivamente. De hecho, muchos de los detractores de Rucka han sugerido que él no puede escribir una historia a menos que tenga una mujer policía para narrarla, pero obviamente esto es una exageración; Rucka ha demostrado que él también puede escribir usando la voz de un protagonista masculino. Y ese es el caso con Wolverine; Logan es claramente el protagonista, y Lathrop, la agente de la ATF, es un personaje secundario rico y humanizador que mantiene el lado animal de Logan en equilibrio.
Getting drunk at a mutant bar / Emborrachándose en un bar mutante

Cuando Logan finalmente encuentra al hombre responsable de la muerte de Lucy también descubre algo más. Los Hermanos del Nuevo Mundo son una secta religiosa, en la que el líder puede tener tantas “novias”, como desee. Las novias son chicas menores de edad, como Lucy, a las que torturan y les lavan el cerebro para tener relaciones sexuales con el líder. Por supuesto, la depravación no termina aquí, y cuando el héroe canadiense entra en lo más profundo de la guarida de la bestia, se enfrenta a una verdad impactante y dolorosa. Inspirado por el mundo que lo rodea, Rucka logra crear un lugar inquietante que se siente muy verídico; de hecho, el elemento más horroroso es ver lo mundanos y realistas que son los miembros de esta secta.

Al final, Logan pierde el control. Se entrega a su rabia de Berserker, y en vez de “hacer lo correcto” (advertir a las autoridades o capturar a los malhechores), empieza a matarlos en una de las masacres más sangrientas. La violencia brutal es extraordinariamente representada por Darick Robertson, un artista muy talentoso que parece especializarse en imágenes despiadadas y controvertidas. Después de la masacre, Logan huye, y la agente Lathrop tiene ahora un misterio aún mayor por resolver.

El epílogo, “Entonces, un cura entra a un bar”, es una conclusión conmovedora y reveladora. Logan no puede lidiar con el hecho de haber matado a más de 20 hombres en una sola noche. Así que hace lo que todo hombre razonable haría: se emborracha en un bar, y no deja de beber hasta que Nightcrawler aparece. Como superhéroe, es fácil para Wolverine (y Nightcrawler) hacer frente a las amenazas cósmicas o a los villanos  megalómanos decididos a conquistar el mundo. Como un hombre que toma la justicia en sus propias manos, sin embargo, las cosas no son fáciles para Logan. Y tal vez él es un héroe tan único y memorable porque al final puede ponerse o quitarse el manto superheroico, si él lo considera conveniente. Pero independientemente de su misión como un Hombre X, siempre tiene que asumir las consecuencias de sus actos.
Wolverine & Nightcrawler 

“Wolverine: Hermandad” bien puede ser una de mis obras favoritas de Greg Rucka. Y lo que hace que esta etapa sea aún más especial es el asombroso arte de Darick Robertson. Años antes de “The Boys, el artista estadounidense estaba perfeccionando su estilo en Marvel Comics. El Logan que vemos aquí es un hombre que lleva encima el peso de incontables años, tiene una expresión amarga y la suficiente crueldad en los ojos como para asustar a la gente; incluso herido, se ve muy peligroso. Las secuencias de batalla son absolutamente impresionantes. Particularmente me encanta la doble página en la que vemos a Logan desatando su furia.

El artista a cargo de las portadas es Esad Ribic, ganador del Arion's Achievement Award como mejor portadista (entre muchos otros reconocimientos); heredero de maestros como Frank Frazetta y Alex Ross, Ribic combina el realismo fotográfico con el impresionismo, y el resultado es una selección premium de portadas preciosas e inolvidables. El Wolverine de Ribic es un tipo duro, pero también un guerrero respetable; no obstante, el artista croata también juega con la noción de virilidad a menudo asociada al mutante más popular, como podemos ver en la última portada, considerada por muchos como el único ejemplo de porno gay en una publicación de Marvel; Ribic le muestra a los fans "Un Nightcrawler desnudo. Un Wolverine que mira la entrepierna con el ceño fruncido", y como si eso no fuera suficiente, también tenemos la sospechosa “ubicación de la botella de cerveza”. Esad Ribic es famoso por su “retorcido sentido del humor”, y esta portada demuestra por qué.

10 comments:

  1. Sounds like an interesting story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A great story with great art. By the way Pat, something tells me you're really going to love my next post.

      Delete
  2. menudo pedazo de artículo, es una pasada! enhorabuena, enlazo tu blog a los favoritos en el mio, un saludo!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hola Angelus, muchas gracias por tus palabras. Espero que sigamos en contacto.

      Saludos.

      Delete
  3. Muy buena historia. Yo la tengo en mi biblioteca en la edición argentina de Conosur. Si bien Wolverine se convirtió en un personaje estereotipado y bastante sobre expuesto con el paso de los años, autores como Rucka nos demostraban que siempre se le podía dar una vueltecita de tuerca al tono de los relatos del mutante canadiense de las garras de adamantium.
    Que sigan las buenas reseñas!!!
    Saludos ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Como bien señalas, el problema es que en los últimos años Wolverine ha sido protagonista de 6 o 7 títulos al mes, y la sobre-exposición ha generado fatiga...

      Delete
    2. Así es. Por lo mismo fue buena decisión que Marvel lo matase por una temporada (no cabe duda que regresará la versión canónica tarde o temprano) a pesar que no ha estado ausente del todo como lo hemos comprobado en Secret wars.

      Delete
    3. De Secret Wars solamente he leído el # 0 (FCBD) y el #1. Este viene a ser mi tercer post sobre Wolverine, también reseñé Weapon X y la saga Old Man Logan (la original, claro, no la nueva de Secret Wars).

      Delete
  4. I haven't read this Wolverine story but sounds like a good read. Great blog. If you want to follow me I may have some blogs that may interest you. I own Incredible Hulk 181 which is an awesome Wolverine cover.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mark, this is an amazing Wolverine story, I really recommend it.
      Wow! You have Hulk #181? That issue is worth a fortune now (Wolverine's first appearance, oh my goodness). You're a lucky guy.

      Delete